Category: I am a Student

What Is Cooperative Care in Veterinary Medicine?

Animal behavior is a crucial aspect of veterinary care.  Whether your pet has pain or just “ain’t doing right,”  the pet’s behavior, body language, and overall demeanor is part of obtaining a thorough and precise physical examination.  Without this type of examination, symptoms and diagnoses may be missed that could make or break the treatment

Boom, Bang, and Clang: Storm and Other Noise Phobias

Storm phobia, or fear of storms, is a common behavior in dogs. Many dogs are terrified of the noise and react by hiding, pacing, panting, trembling, peeing, pooping, drooling, and destroying things. Some dogs even take it to the extreme of hurting themselves by jumping through windows and doors. These behaviors can appear during a Read More

Applying Eye Drops with Low Stress Handling™

At some point in many dogs’ lives, they will require eye drops. This might be a one-time event to examine the eye or it may be multiple times per day to treat chronic disease. Regardless of the cause, applying eyedrops need not be a struggle for you or the pet, whether at home or in

The Drug Resistant Client – Understanding Why Clients Would Refuse Medications

Advances in animal behavior have helped veterinarians provide less stressful care to many patients, both large and small. The ability to correctly read the body language of stress before it reaches aggression, and then respond to this by changing the exam room, treatment, and hospitalization areas has helped keep staff safe and prevented aggression.[1]  There are

The Bunny Burrito

    Maple  We are grateful to J.C. Burcham, DVM, for her permission to use the following photos and text. Many thanks to our model, Mr. Maple (pictured to the right), for his excellent cooperation in demonstrating towel wrapping.      Bunny Towel Wrap     Maple is placed in the center of a regular-sized bath

The Collar Hold

    The index and middle finger form a curve that hooks over the top of the collar, behind the base of the ear.  You may hold with your thumb from underneath as well to avoid slipping around the collar. Replace any choke, or prong, collars with a flat nylon buckle collar that is at

Low Stress Handling® Silver-Level Certification

Individual Certification at this level demonstrates to clients and employers the individual’s dedicated interest in Low Stress Handling®. Hospital Certification at this level demonstrates to clients and staff the hospital’s commitment to appropriately training staff in Low Stress Handling® methods.

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